Skin, Hair & Nails

Shingles Vaccine Offers Little Protection

Date: 31 January, 2013

When it comes to vaccines, I am the last one to jump on the bandwagon. The shingles vaccine is another example of why I have little or no respect for the mainstream’s hyper aggressive vaccine push.

This one is just plain ridiculous…

In November last year, the UK Department of Health (DoH) gave its approval for GPs to vaccinate against shingles (herpes zoster) for the first time. Back then, the DoH also announced that it would make its decision on whether to go ahead with a national vaccination campaign for older people (those 60 and over), in the coming months.

More recently, across the pond, the US Centres for Disease Control (CDC) announced that everyone over 60 should get a shingles vaccine… EVEN if they’ve already had shingles.

Shingles: A thousand needles

For those of you who haven’t had shingles, let me tell you, it’s one of the most painful things I have ever experienced. It felt like someone was poking needles from the inside of my body out. I couldn’t even get dressed without curling up with pain.

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Truth be told, I will do anything to avoid that kind of pain. When I finally went to my doctor, he told me that it was shingles. I was shocked. I wasn’t even 25 yet.

The real kicker was when he also told me that if you’ve had chicken pox, you are a prime candidate for shingles — at any age. If you have a period of extreme stress, you are likely to get an outbreak.

This explained my outbreak, because I was buying a property for the first time in my life.

So now, should I get the shingles vaccine?

The simple answer is “No.”

A recent US study found that the risk of a second shingles outbreak is extremely low. In fact, among the participants in the study the recurrence rate was just 19 cases per 10,000 shingles patients.

Among the participants who were unvaccinated, the rate was just 24 cases per 10,000. So, if you crunch the numbers, the shingles vaccine only prevented recurrence for 5 people in every 10,000.

However, those are my calculations. According to a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) analysis, the vaccine prevents shingles in only one out of every 175 people.

Clearly, if you’ve already had shingles, the value of the vaccine is nil.

The only value this vaccine does have is for Big Pharma. In the UK, the DoH has not rolled out with their national vaccination programme and the vaccine is only available if your GP decides that it is wise to get one. This means that you may end up paying for the shot. In the US, the shot costs $200 a pop.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take one simple precaution to avoid a shingles outbreak.

The shingles virus attacks the nerves and you can protect your nerves with vitamin B-12. According to world-renowned alternative health expert, Dr. Spreen, a daily B-12 dose of 500 mcg offers sufficient protection.

Unlike the vaccine, however, B-12 also helps protect your bones and your brain. So even if you’ve already had shingles, this preventive measure is invaluable.

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Sources:

“GPs given green light to start shingles vaccination”, published online 02.11.12, pulsetoday.co.uk.

“Herpes Zoster Vaccine and the Incidence of Recurrent Herpes Zoster in an Immunocompetent Elderly Population” Journal of Infectious Diseases, Published online ahead of print, 6/4/12, jid.oxfordjournals.org

“Zoster Vaccine Shows No Benefit After a Shingles Episode” Yael Waknine, Medscape, 6/7/12, medscape.com

“Fungicide Used on Farm Crops Linked to Insulin Resistance” Press Release from the Endocrine Society, 6/25/12, newswise.com

 

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Comments

  1. Denise Posted March 1, 2013

    I have had Shingles for 10 years (in my face, oesophagus as well as Herpes Zoster Opthalmicus). My Rheumathologist had me vaccinated AFTER it started. Took Zelitrex for 13 months, but nothing worked.
    I have been taking Lycine and Threonine powder for 4 months, and have excellent results. Lysine on its own did not seem to make a difference. Have already had 27 out of 58 days free of Shingles in 2013 (compared to 39/365 in 2012). The Shingles seems to be on the way out, flares are much shorter and lighter!
    I sometimes wonder what role the vaccine played in the fact that I couldn’t get rid of it for 10 long, painful years…

  2. SHIRLEY GOODING Posted February 3, 2013

    I am recovering from my 10th shingles attack! I suffer with fibromyalgia and many other ” problems ” Even though I have suffered the agony of shingles I would never advise shingles vaccine. I am almost certainly suffering such bad health because of whooping cough vaccine administered in 1947. I have discovered it was never well tested.
    In my experiance unless really necessary vaccine should be avoided.
    With this attack I used virgin coconut oil on the blisters which proved to help so much with the dreadful pain and itching. I dont even take the medication as I have had dreadful reactions.
    The after pain is unavoidable, and should be treated as with any other pain.I suffer with chronic pain and have discovered that it’s something one has to come to terms with. I use pain medication when my pain increases above a managable level.

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